UNESCO

A few links to some of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites I have visited on my travels

Ireland

Skellig Michael

This monastic complex, perched since about the 7th century on the steep sides of the rocky island of Skellig Michael, some 12 km off the coast of south-west Ireland, illustrates the very spartan existence of the first Irish Christians. Since the extreme remoteness of Skellig Michael has until recently discouraged visitors, the site is exceptionally well preserved.

Check my previous post, Puffins Here Puffins There, if you missed my recap.

Also check out From Green to Blue’s account of our trip to Skellig.

Skellig Michael UNESCO World Heritage Site

Newgrange

The three main prehistoric sites of the Brú na Bóinne Complex, Newgrange, Knowth and Dowth, are situated on the north bank of the River Boyne 50 km north of Dublin. This is Europe’s largest and most important concentration of prehistoric megalithic art. The monuments there had social, economic, religious and funerary functions.

Newgrange UNESCO World Heritage Site

Northern Ireland

The Giants Causeway

The Giant’s Causeway lies at the foot of the basalt cliffs along the sea coast on the edge of the Antrim plateau in Northern Ireland. It is made up of some 40,000 massive black basalt columns sticking out of the sea. The dramatic sight has inspired legends of giants striding over the sea to Scotland. Geological studies of these formations over the last 300 years have greatly contributed to the development of the earth sciences, and show that this striking landscape was caused by volcanic activity during the Tertiary, some 50–60 million years ago.

Check my post about our trip to The Giants Causeway

The Giants Causeway UNESCO World Heritage Site

England

Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey

Westminster Palace, rebuilt from the year 1840 on the site of important medieval remains, is a fine example of neo-Gothic architecture. The site – which also comprises the small medieval Church of Saint Margaret, built in Perpendicular Gothic style, and Westminster Abbey, where all the sovereigns since the 11th century have been crowned – is of great historic and symbolic significance.

Check out one of my previous posts about my first week in London, including details about my tour of the Palace and the Abbey.

Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey UNESCO World Heritage Site

Tower of London

The massive White Tower is a typical example of Norman military architecture, whose influence was felt throughout the kingdom. It was built on the Thames by William the Conqueror to protect London and assert his power. The Tower of London – an imposing fortress with many layers of history, which has become one of the symbols of royalty – was built around the White Tower.

Tower of London UNESCO World Heritage Site

Scotland

Old and New Towns of Edinburgh

Edinburgh has been the Scottish capital since the 15th century. It has two distinct areas: the Old Town, dominated by a medieval fortress; and the neoclassical New Town, whose development from the 18th century onwards had a far-reaching influence on European urban planning. The harmonious juxtaposition of these two contrasting historic areas, each with many important buildings, is what gives the city its unique character.

Check out one of my previous posts detailing my trip to Edinburgh

Old and New Towns of Edinburgh UNESCO World Heritage Site

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